Friday, April 1, 2011

U.S. Crude Oil Production, 1970-2010 -- EIA

by Aaron and David Rachovich


United States Crude Oil Production, 1970-2010



Year
Crude Oil Production*
 (million barrels per day)

Year
Crude Oil Production*
 (million barrels per day)
1970
9.637
1991
7.417
1971
9.463
1992
7.171
1972
9.441
1993
6.847
1973
9.208
1994
6.662
1974
8.774
1995
6.560
1975
8.375
1996
6.465
1976
8.132
1997
6.452
1977
8.245
1998
6.252
1978
8.707
1999
5.881
1979
8.552
2000
5.822
1980
8.597
2001
5.801
1981
8.572
2002
5.746
1982
8.649
2003
5.681
1983
8.688
2004
5.419
1984
8.879
2005
5.178
1985
8.971
2006
5.102
1986
8.680
2007
5.064
1987
8.349
2008
4.950
1988
8.140
2009
5.361
1989
7.613
2010
5.512 (5.482 updated)
1990
7.355
 2011
UPD
5.644




*Includes lease condensate. And since the mid-2000s, oil production from shale formations.

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Please also see Figure 1. U.S. Crude Oil Production, 1970-2010

(In 1970, U.S. crude oil production was at an all-time high of 9.637 million barrels per day---please see table and Figure 1. above. Also, please see my post "United States: Domestic Oil Production Reversed Decades-Long Decline in 2009 and 2010," here. And in a speech at Georgetown University in Washington, March 30th, President Obama said, "Last year [i.e., 2010], American oil production reached its highest level since 2003, and for the first time in more than a decade [last time 1997 - 49% -- D.R.], oil we imported [net imports of both crude oil and refined products -- D.R.] accounted for less than half the liquid fuel we consumed [i.e., 49% -- D.R.]."---please see table above and my post "US to Find 'More Oil at Home,' While Cutting Consumption: President Obama," remarks below, here. Currently, the United States still relies heavily on imported oil. In 2010, it imported 9.163 million b/d of crude oil and nearly 2.6 million b/d of refined products. Half of all U.S. net imports (imports minus exports) of liquid fuels, i.e., net imports of crude oil and petroleum products, etc., in 2010 came from the Americas---please see my post "Half of U.S. Liquid Fuels Net Imports in 2010 Came from the Americas," here. Moreover, please see our post "United States: Top 8 Crude Oil Producing States, 2006-Feb.2011," and U.S. oil reserves in our post "World's Top 22 Proven Oil Reserves Holders," here. Update: please see my post "EIA Expects Higher U.S. Crude Production," UPI, Mar 7, 2012. Update 2: North Dakota passed Alaska in March 2012 to become the second-leading state in crude oil production, trailing only Texas. Recent advancements in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing in North Dakota's Bakken shale play as well as other shale plays, such as South Texas Eagle Ford shale, have led to an increase in U.S. oil output. For a detailed account of North Dakota's oil production and its recent oil boom, please see my post "North Dakota Tops Alaska in Oil Production, Trailing Only Texas," including remarks. Furthermore, please see EIA data on weekly U.S. field production of crude oil, Jan 7, 1983 - Nov 30, 2012. -- D.R.)   

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